About WIN House

Serving Edmonton and area for over five decades, we’ve been offering women, non-binary individuals, and children a safe place to flee. The care we have for the people we serve can be seen through our passionate professionals, volunteers, and dedicated donors and champions of the cause. WIN House is committed to continuing to provide safety, support, relief, and resources.

OUR MISSION

WIN House exists to further non-violent relationships and environments for women and non-binary individuals with or without children.

OUR VISION

Women, non-binary individuals, and children are safe and free from abuse in their environments and relationships.

OUR VALUES

WIN House is people focused and forward-thinking, without exception.

WIN House didn't start as a shelter...

... not as a shelter for women who had suffered abuse, but a home for transient women. Daisy Wilson noticed the increased number of transient women at the downtown Greyhound station.

1968

Never doubt a small group of committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

Margaret Mead

In 1968, a group of 28 organizations met to discuss the growing problem of houseless women. An action committee was formed to establish a point of contact and referral for the women.

1970

THERE WAS NO HELP EVEN BEFORE A SHELTER

In 1970, this storefront was expanded and an overnight emergency shelter was opened in the basement of All Saints Cathedral. The overnight shelter had only one staff person, and the women slept on floor mats. The shelter was unable to offer meals. As a result, the women depended on All Saint’s Cathedral for shelter and the YWCA for meals.

1973

EDMONTON WOMEN'S SHELTER IS INCORPORATED

Once incorporated they began to work towards raising funds to build a shelter where women could find both food and emergency accommodations. 

1978

THE FIRST SHELTER IS OPENED

The first house was able to provide shelter to six families so women could escape their abusers and begin to plan their new lives.

5 women are standing together and smiling. Only their necks and heads are visible.